ARE O.Gz SUPPOSED TO RETIRE FROM THE STREETS Pt. 1

When is it time for an OG to retire from the streets? Alternatively, is there any such a thing? I delivered a speech about my life story to some students (18 to 25 years old) today. As I addressed them, they became fascinated by my yore. I was promoting my new book, “Crime Rhymez” as the second edition of my first publication, “My book of Chrymes.” Then it hit me. There are 23 and 25-year-old people now who had not experienced what I did when I was 16 years old. At 17, I lived like a 35-year-old. By 26 years of age, I’d made accomplishments of which an average 50 years old person may dream. Speaking on my new book brought my whole life story in the outlook of what I’d seen and done in the streets. I began to question if there is a point where I should quit? If so, then how when it could comprise of the bulk of all I know?

There are 23 and 25-year-old people now who had not experienced what I did when I was 16 years old. At 17, I lived like a 35-year-old. By 26 years of age, I’d made accomplishments of which an average 50 years old person may dream.”

THE DIFFERENCE

The streets are very different today. The culture is unconventional. The code of ethics and mentality has changed dramatically. Going out to the club, for example, almost certainly never ends well for anyone anymore. In fact, whether good or bad, ending well may have a different meaning today. How so? Well, for one, there is way more alcohol out there today than there were in 1995. Back then, if you drank three pints of beer and smoked a joint, you’d sleep well. For an average person, if you threw in some sex with those three beers and a joint, you’d have an impressive story to tell. Today, people take pills and snort powders only to arrive at the club as functioning addicts to their slew intoxicants. Another thing that has changed is the dating culture and sexual orientations. A straight person from my era may struggle with that.

THE GENERATION AFTER THE 1990s

Back in our day, if you’d taken a pretty woman to the club, bought her a few drinks and got some good laughs you could call that a great night. Today, one of them might regret the night if there was no sex at the end. Also, gay and transgender people were still in the proverbial closet. One did not have to deal with the reversed xenophobia that happens when a straight person is blamed for feeling awkward in certain related situations. Moreover, the 1990s generation won’t go away. If you were a teen in the 90s chances are you are still reluctant to drop the mic and walk away. You may even sag your pants, use 90s slang, listen to 90s music and behave as though today’s generation is out of touch.

FINALLY

The reality is that we just won’t leave the next generation alone. The irony is that there is a 00s generation. We who grew up in the 1990s believe we are the best and want our era to last forever. At one point, we will have to answer the dreaded question. When is it time to pack it up and walk away? What does that mean? Sometimes you’d find 40+ years old legends, who already have an impressive legacy still trying to hang in the same arena as a 22-year-old person who may be at the start their journey. The proceeding generations have had to compromise with some of our most absurd reactions to their trends and fashion simply because the OGs still want to dictate how they should experience their era.*

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