Scottie Beam – We See You, Sis

I’ve I have met some sisters who carry the torch of blackness and the importance for people to hear them. What I haven’t heard is what these sisters are saying. That is why we should give Scottie Beam a platform so that she can acquaint the world about her beliefs. We want to be down, but many of us (masculine and heterosexual black men) cannot understand how this movement benefits society. Like, how does it strengthen the black family, how does it enhance black courtship? How does it empower black youth? These sisters deserve our respect. We also understand that they love themselves. Except, if they ask us for love, respect and adherence to their message, do we want to know what that means to our community in general? Where does the acceptance of Scottie Beam’s message leave us? 

I know that I want women to be safe in the streets. I do not wish to see sexually objectified or exploited women. I want them to receive equal pay for equal work, and I want to see more women in powerful positions.”

I wrote the poem, “Black Woman” a while back and converted it to a yet to be recorded Hip Hop song. Here are the words:

BLACK WOMAN

A strong person from that sugar cane plantation
Independent woman, your husband is locked in prison
Too much pressure he embraced that life of crime
Caught up in a system with no type of sunshine
He is doing’ a dime
When he comes home the cops will take him out with a nine
So you’re savin’ up your chips to dip
The generational eclipse
To feed the kids and to send em to school
You let em hustle in the street ‘caise you ain’t raising a fool
Birthdays were the best days
When we sipped lemonade and danced to Sade

You’re the mother of the earth
A daughter of the earth
Cold-hearted, why you had to be a sister of the earth

Black woman, you’re the daughter of the planet
Since birth only you can figure how much you’re worth
You are Harriet Tubman
Sendin’ your peeps to freedom
But each day is a countdown to the day you’d get hung
Cause the people who you trust will be the ones to get you stung
You are Rasa Park when you get on life’s bus
All we have is us; the pimp exploits you for lust
Ashes to that ashes, dust to the dust
It’s a must, nothin’ less than the queen of the earth
You demand your respect because it’s true
Only you can figure how much you are worth

You remember your roots
Did you touch that foreign omen
Don’t forget the strange fruit

Don’t forget that when you’re low the only ones to be there
Are your brothers and sons, your father and your husband, you hear

These sisters deserve to be heard and respected. We get that. They love themselves. We understand that. But if they’re asking us to love, respect, and listen to their message, we want to know what that does for our community as a whole?”

Black Woman you’re the mother of the earth
Black Woman, daughter of the earth
Black Woman you’re the sister of the earth
Black Woman you’re the wife of the earth

Black Woman, You are a black woman
Black Woman, You are a black woman
Black Woman, Black Woman, Black Woman
Black Woman, Black Woman, Black Woman

We used to be slaves together
When master used to use the whip we would pray together
Even though we knew we were doomed
We would secretly jump the broom
Danced with a heavy heart to the fiddle of that African tune
For our escape by the dark of the moon
Soul food in the kitchen
The recipe is passed down from big mama
Massa doesn’t want no African teaching, he caused trauma
Whip in one hand with a bible in the other hand preachin’
But he doesn’t want us readin’ ’bout the Egyptians
How the Israelites people fought for their freedom
How they roamed around the wilderness ‘cause they were disobedient

Broke the family up
He sold our children away
Shot em dead in the face so he could keep rapin’ away
You are pregnant with his seed now he gets more slaves that way
As the years rolled by you got old and eventually, you finally died
Tossed your body in a hole nobody left to cry
No husband, no children while you float in the sky

You remember your roots?
Did you touch that foreign omen?
Don’t forget the strange fruit

Don’t forget that when you’re low the only ones to be there
Are your brothers and sons, your father and your husband, you hear?

Black Woman you’re the mother of the earth
Black Woman, daughter of the earth
Black Woman you’re the sister of the earth
Black Woman you’re the wife of the earth

Black Woman, You are a black woman
Black Woman, You are a black woman
Black Woman, Black Woman, Black Woman
Black Woman, Black Woman, Black Woman

Greenville Sharp, William Wilberforce
Hannah Moore, Pope George XVI, Somerset flees on a horse
Abolition is history, settin’ free our ethnicity
Emancipation Proclamation, just another trickery
We’re free, but now we can’t find us a peaceful home
Black woman, you’re not alone, but you’re the riverside stone
They’re lockin’ your husband up and shootin’ your sons down
No jobs for your father but whiskey is in his cup
And your brother, he’s just tryna turn his life around

Civil Right Movements leaders assassinated
Saudi Arabia still enslavin’ the castrated
Discrimination and segregation
The black woman with a heart
Keep your daughters from getting’ raped, holdin’ down the fort
Then you turned around and seen your black man would betray
Gettin’ murdered for white women, he looks the other way
Signed their soul to the racist
Opened the door for the feminist
They put the chain around our brains so now we slaves again
Beggin’ at the master’s feet so he would stop the pain
Knockin’ on heaven’s door to get us out from the rain

You remember your roots?
Did you touch that foreign omen?
Don’t forget the strange fruit

Don’t forget that when you’re low the only ones to be there
Are your brothers and sons, your father and your husband you hear?

Black Woman you’re the mother of the earth
Black Woman, daughter of the earth
Black Woman you’re the sister of the earth
Black Woman you’re the wife of the earth

Black Woman, You are a black woman
Black Woman, You are a black woman
Black Woman, Black Woman, Black Woman
Black Woman, Black Woman, Black Woman

Are we (masculine and straight black men) included in this journey? If so, they should tell us what they want us to do. These are some of our questions. Okay, the first main question is, what does it mean to be a black woman from Scottie Beam’s perspective? Does this blackness include being African, or does it only relate to African-American women? I read about feminism a long time ago. At that time, I surmised it as a search for female equality. Then, of course, I agreed with that. I had not studied the ideology well enough to know its advantages or disadvantages regarding the traditional system of African religion or culture. When I moved to Toronto, it took me a while to realize what was happening.

Eventually, it became clear to me that feminism is not just a movement; It is an ideology that perpetuates a specific lifestyle for many people. As someone who grew up in a Christian and African environment, I knew that the world needed equality for women. However, I struggled with the definition of such authorization when traditions and religions entered the equation. Who does not want justice for women? I know that I want women to be safe in the streets. I do not wish to see sexually objectified or exploited women. I want them to receive equal pay for equal work, and I want to see more women in powerful positions. Then, at that time, I was and continue to be a defender of women’s rights and justice.

The fact that women had not enjoyed the same level of respect in our world, in general, is an absolute shame to civilization. When it came to black women, I see them as African. That said, that is not as far as my current understanding goes with male-bashing, gender war, and emasculation of the masculine behavior of heterosexual men. Therefore black women can have equal rights and justice without being adverse to men or taking on the beautiful features of Caucasian women. Honestly, I do not think the black man was ever a patriarch. Therefore, it’s weird when black women look at black men that way. In my opinion, black feminism should be about the collective empowerment of all black people.*

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